Thoughts From Your Pastor

Jun 1, 2017 8:09 am

June Message

Former TV political correspondent Tabitha Soren once said: “No matter how secular our culture becomes, it will remain drenched in the Bible. Since we will be haunted by the Bible, even if you don’t know it, doesn’t it make sense to read it?” I’m afraid that seems less and less true. Still the Bible remains the most important book in history. But who wrote the Scriptures? Is the Bible true? Can it be trusted?
Read 2 Timothy 3:16 and 2 Peter 1:20-21. The Bible itself makes a fantastic claim about its authorship. The author is God. The Scriptures were inspired and breathed out by God. The Bible is a holy and divine book because it comes from a holy and divine source – God.
How did God do it? The writers of the Bible “were carried along by the Holy Spirit” (2 Peter 1:21, NIV), and as God spoke to them, they wrote. This means that God used their personalities, vocabularies, experiences, and culture to record exactly what He wanted written. The Bible is true.
But can it be trusted? Yes, because of its prophecy and unity. The overall theme of the Bible is humankind’s salvation through Jesus Christ. The Old Testament contains over 300 prophecies, many giving specific details of the life of Jesus. Statistician Peter Stoner has calculated that the probability of five major prophecies coming to pass by chance would be one in two quintillion. It’s comprised of 66 books, written by some 40 different authors, over 1,500 years. Yet, it is a unified book about one theme: Jesus Christ.
Because the Bible is God’s Word, we should spend time reading it every day and respond to it with humble submission to its authority. I have found a helpful app for my cell phone. It is “YouVersion”; it is a free Bible on your phone, tablet, and computer. YouVersion is a simple, ad-free Bible that brings God’s Word into your daily life (Check it out at www.youversion.com). You may choose short or long-term daily reading, that take 5 minutes or less. There are devotions for adults, youth, and even kids. Give it a try!
The Bible should be our standard of living. Set aside a little time each day to read the letter God has written to you.
Pastor Mitchell



Apr 21, 2017 9:17 am

May 2017

The end of this month our nation has set aside a day to remember the men and women who gave the ultimate sacrifice, their lives, serving our nation. We thank them, as well as those who courageously served in the armed forces, during times of peace and times of conflict.
Every day, hundreds of Americans receive military honors at their funerals. The Department Veterans Affairs estimate that 372 World War II veterans die every day. There aren’t too many left. At their service a two-person uniformed honor guard folds and presents a United States flag to the surviving family members, followed by a solemn rendition of Taps. To address concerns over a shortage of qualified buglers, the Defense Department has approved an electronic bugle that plays the song automatically when a stand-in places a horn to his or her lips.
Sometimes innovative substitutes will meet the requirements, but nothing beats the real thing when it comes to relationships. Paul rarely passed up an opportunity to meet with believers on his missionary journeys (read Acts 20:1-6). Why was this important to him? God created each of us with a deep desire for relationships with real people. So, God put followers of His Son into a family called “the church” and has asked us to make meeting together a high priority.
I worry about our younger generations, who seem to prefer relationships on their wireless phones or other electronic devices then face-to-face relationships.
As a believer, are you really involved with your church family, where you can share your life, concerns, and blessings with others? Watching worship on television and listening to Christian music may meet a need in your spiritual life. But consider how it compares to real life, face-to-face encouragement, and the opportunity to reach out and serve.
We hope to see you this coming Sunday!
Pastor Mitchell



Mar 28, 2017 8:56 am

April 2017

From where I’m sitting, I can see the folder holding my 2016 tax papers. It makes me want to get up and do about anything else. I don’t like preparing, nor paying my taxes. I’m always thankful when April 15th is behind me for another 12 months (this year we have until April 18th). And I assume most of you feel the same way. I haven’t met a person yet who jumps up and down with enthusiasm about paying taxes.
What if you received a personal letter from the IRS that said, “Dear what-ever-your-name-is, someone else has paid your taxes in full, and left an open tab so you’ll never have to sweat April 15th again”? Wouldn’t that be incredible?
That’s a limited metaphor for what Jesus did on the cross. His blood paid the price for our sins, forever. The theme of judgment is very real in Scripture. The Old Testament gives us the Ten Commandments and other laws, to show us how God intends us to live. They really don’t help us live a righteous, godly life; they show us where we fall short. We are also told what we must do to atone for our sins. The problem is we can never do enough, or be good enough, long enough. A permanent solution required the death of God’s Son. Then, and only then, was God’s justice fully satisfied. Our Judge became our Father. Therefore, if we put our faith in Christ, we will never face the punishment our sins deserve. Our debt is paid in full (read John 3:16-17).
I wish I could tell you how to get your taxes paid-in-full forever, but I can’t. I can tell you how to have your sins paid-in-full: accept God’s mercy and grace offered in the atoning death of Jesus the Christ, our Lord.
As the old hymn reminds us:
“Jesus paid it all,
All to Him I owe;
Sin had left a crimson stain,
He washed it white as snow.”
Pastor Mitchell



Feb 23, 2017 7:44 am

March Message

As I considered the subject of my article for this month, it seemed appropriate to consider the meaning of Lent, since it begins on March 1st this year. The season of Lent has not been emphasized in many Protestant churches, largely because it was associated with “high church” liturgical worship, that some churches were eager to reject. Many of those churches are now recovering many aspects of the older Christian traditions as a means to re-focus on spirituality in a culture that is increasingly secular.
Originating in the 4th century, the season of Lent spans 40 weekdays. It begins on Ash Wednesday and ends on the day before Easter. Ash Wednesday’s name comes from the ancient practice of placing ashes on the worshippers’ foreheads as a sign of humility before God, a symbol of mourning and sorrow for the sins of the world. The number 40 is connected with many biblical events, but especially with the 40 days Jesus spent in the wilderness preparing for His ministry by facing the temptations that could lead Him to abandon His mission and calling. Originally, Lent was the time of preparation for those who were to be baptized, a time of concentrated study and prayer before their baptism on Easter Day. And since these new members were to be received into a living community of faith, the entire community was called to prepare.
Today, Lent is marked by a time of prayer and preparation to celebrate Easter, the Resurrection of our Lord. Since Sundays celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus, the six Sundays that occur during Lent are not counted as part of the 40 days, and are referred to as the Sundays in Lent.
Christians today focus on it as a time of prayer, especially penance, repenting for failures and sin as a way to admit our need for God’s grace. It is a time of preparation to celebrate God’s marvelous redemption made possible by our Lord’s crucifixion, and the resurrected life that we live, and hope for, as Christians.
An appropriate prayer to pray during Lent is the prayer of the publican in the Temple (Luke 18:13). “God, have mercy on me, a sinner.”
Pastor Mitchell



Feb 9, 2017 8:46 am

February Message

Did you make a New Year’s resolution to start a diet, or join a gym or the YMCA?
If you watch any television, you have seen advertisement after advertisement for diets and gyms. And of course, they all promise great results. After the holidays and facing a new year, people want to be healthier in the new year. So, they resolve to start a diet or exercise program.
It is reported that 16% of new health club members join the 2nd week of January. Only 1 in 5 who sign-up, actually use it. That’s only 20%. 80% of those who made New Year’s resolutions drop off by the 2nd week of February. And by the end of February only 1 to 2% remains.
We easily give up because it takes too much effort. But the old saying holds true – “No pain, no gain!”
To achieve strong muscles, you have to use them. If I needed to move a cement block, I could do it, as long as I didn’t have to take it too far. But if I moved a cement block every day, I would soon be able to move it easier or farther.
The same goes for our faith. Maybe that’s why we have trials, to prepare us for bigger trials. Or to be able to support a brother or sister, as they endure a trial. If our faith isn’t tested, we may lose it. We slip into thinking that we can handle whatever comes along on our own. Consider James 1:12: “12 Blessed is the one who perseveres under trial because, having stood the test, that person will receive the crown of life that the Lord has promised to those who love him” (NIV).
Now I’m not saying that we should look for hardships, but we can lean on God and one another, whatever the new year holds.
Pastor Mitchell



Jan 5, 2017 8:35 am

January Message

Pastor’s Article
“1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth… 27 So God created man in His own image, in the image of God He created them, male and female He created them” (Genesis 1). Read all of Genesis, chapter 1.
If you and I are to truly believe that we’re made in the image of God, shouldn’t there be evidence that we are indeed godlike? Dare we even be so presumptuous, knowing that our first forebears were made from the dust of a tiny planet in a remote corner of a vast universe by a creator God whose intelligence and power defies imagination? How is it remotely possible that we could be like such a God? God is spirit and we are but dust. Then again, we’re not just any old dust. We are dust that breathes … and dust that dies. And – if the end of the story be told – we are souls made for eternity.
Is it possible that we have overlooked the obvious – that we too are creators? No, it doesn’t mean that you and I are purposed to create a cosmic universe from nothing. It simply means that, like God, we too can dream big dreams and have the creativity to make them happen! In crafting this intricate universe, God was a genius engineer, architect, scientist, musician, mathematician, and artist. And all to His glory. To be made in the image of the Creator is to be a creature who creates! Whether it be breathtaking beauty in music or art, sheer genius in math, or molding a child into a precious person of faith, God has gifted us all with a tiny touch of His own creative spark. In the new year ahead, how can you use your creative abilities to benefit your community and the world?
Pastor Mitchell



Dec 6, 2016 9:38 am

December Pastor's Message

Do you think you could capture Niagara Falls in a teacup? How can a helpless baby contain the Creator of the universe? Does anyone pretend to understand the awesome love in the heart of God, that inspired, motivated, and brought about Christmas?
God entered our world not with the crushing impact of unbearable glory, but in a vulnerable Child. On a lonely night in an obscure cave near Bethlehem, the Son of God became a humble, naked, and helpless infant. God has come to us and allowed us to get close to Him.
Take a moment and read Colossians 1:15-20 (especially verse 19).
The Bethlehem mystery will always be a scandal to those who seek a triumphant Savior and a prosperity Gospel. The infant Jesus was born in unimpressive circumstances. His parents were of no social significance, and His chosen welcoming committee were all losers – dirt-poor shepherds.
Pious imagination and nostalgic music rob Christmas of its shock value, but the “poor in spirit” tremble at the stable in adoration of the in-breaking of God Almighty. All the Santa Clauses and red-nosed reindeer, 30-foot trees, and thundering church bells put together create less chaos than the infant Jesus, when, instead of remaining a statue in a manger or a crib, He comes alive and delivers us from ourselves. He opened the door of Heaven to let us in.
Don’t forget the reason for the season! Merry Christmas!

Pastor Mitchell



Oct 28, 2016 2:10 pm

November 2016 Pastor's Message

Read Ezra 3:10-13.
On October 3, 1863, at the height of the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln issued a Proclamation of Thanksgiving, calling the nation to observe a “day of Thanksgiving and Praise.” This proclamation eventually led to the establishing of our national day of Thanksgiving.
The document began by listing multiple blessings the nation had experienced through the course of the year, even in the midst of a severe conflict. It called the American people to recognize the Source of those blessings and to respond collectively to the Giver in gratitude, repentance, and intercession. Here’s an excerpt:
“No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy.
“It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States… to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens.
“And I recommend to them that… they do also with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience … fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquility and Union.”
Set against a background of divisive conflict, our nation’s leader in the 1860s was humble enough to know that our nation needed God and needed to be grateful. This kind of heart is no less needed in our nation today than it was then. Our nation isn’t in physical combat, but there is an ongoing war of words that has become more heated by the day.
The call to gratitude goes beyond the church and into every avenue of life. Pray today for a humble, grateful, repentant spirit to be born in our own hearts, and among our leaders at every level.
Pastor Mitchell



Sep 27, 2016 10:04 am

October 2016

Remember the old Verizon Wireless commercial, where the actor walks all over the place and keeps asking: “Can you hear me now?” Of course, Verizon wanted consumers to know that their cell phone coverage was everywhere.
Now the same actor is working for Sprint. He tells his fellow actor that he now promotes Sprint, because their coverage is within 1% of Verizon’s and it costs much less.
Let’s admit it, we all want to be heard. As a parent, or a teacher, have you ever said, “Listen, you need to hear this?”
Listen to the message God sent to the Israelites through the prophet Isaiah: “Come to me with your ears wide open. Listen, and you will find life (Isaiah 55:3). Read the larger passage Isaiah 55:1-6. God wants our attention. He wants our ears wide open – and our hearts wide open too. In other words, we could pray our prayers and then just walk away. But suppose we learn to wait in His presence, listening for His response? Isn’t prayer a two-way conversation, after all?
I’ve probably shared this before, but praying without pausing to listen is like stopping to ask for directions, and then speeding off before the person has a chance to actually give you directions!
Sometimes I think I have God all figured out. I’ve been a pastor for 40 years and a Christian longer than that, and it’s easy for me to “assume” that I know what God wishes to say. How silly! How arrogant! I am a finite creature, and God is infinite. I must listen, if I am to know even a tiny fragment of God’s full reality.
And while I can know God to the extent His self-revelation allows, it all depends on the level of my listening. Ears open; heart open. That’s how I want to be today. How about you? Let’s pray and listen…
Pastor Mitchell



Sep 1, 2016 10:50 am

September 2016

In times of crisis it’s difficult to know whom to trust. Put your trust in the wrong people, and you could end up in serious trouble. Consider a civil war, for example. Who among your neighbors is a secret informant, and who is on your side? Because we can never be completely sure, it’s not surprising that normally we would turn to trusted friends for advice and counsel. But what if those friends are wrong – or not as loyal as we thought? That was the problem with pitiful King Zedekiah (read Jeremiah 37-38, especially verses 38:20-28). In the time of siege, he ended up trusting the wrong source. King Zedekiah sought Jeremiah’s advice, but went with the wishes of the princes of the land. Why anyone would take another person’s word over God’s is a mystery. Even if the truth is ugly, it still remains the truth! One can live in denial only so long before running headlong into the truth. Just ask Zedekiah!
Because there’s no way we can be totally sure of any human advice, our safest course of action is to seek God’s counsel.
I’ve heard stories of churches in China that have had only one Bible for an entire congregation. They take that Bible, tear out pages, and give them to individual members of the congregation to memorize. For many of these underground Christians, Bibles are as valuable as gold – even more so. We need to see that same value in God’s Word and not take it for granted. As Psalm 19:9-10 states, “The laws of the LORD … are more desirable than gold, even the finest gold.”
Do you look for a quarter if you drop it? I do. Let’s say that you somehow misplaced one million dollars. Do you think you would search for it? My point is that there is buried gold in the pages of Scripture. When you’re reading through the Bible think about it as though you were mining for gold. You need to get into it, search it, and find all the treasure that’s in the Bible for you. Don’t know where to start? Start with the Gospel of John, or join the Adult Sunday School class, or our upcoming Bible study.
Pastor Mitchell